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I figured I'd start a thread that I've seen on some other forums I belong to. It is usually car or bike related, but really could be anything.

Today I did some work on my '90 Prelude driver/trackday car. It's a rust free car but the battery tray has seen better days. Apparently battery corrosion took off the paint and proceeded to dissolve much of the metal, even the heads of the bolts that fasten it to the body. I thought it would be a 30 minute job to replace it, but it turned into 3 hours of cutting, grinding, drilling, and then painting (priming).

Once I got the old battery tray out, I saw the extent of the corrosion. Honda made their own anti-lock brake system back then and called it ALB. They couldn't call it ABS apparently because that term was copyrighted. It's a neat system that uses a separate brake fluid reservoir and hydraulic circuit to facilitate the "pumping" of the brakes when lockup is imminent. It has a violent and noisy kickback in the pedal that reminds me of the Teves Mk II system in the 505 :P The system takes up a lot of real estate though, and unfortunately many of the expensive bits live under the battery tray--bits like the accumulator, pump, and some plumbing.

Because the rust/corrosion had spread down there, I had to remove all of that stuff, inspect it (it was alright), then paint/prime the brackets and support structure down there as well.

Anyway, I think I'll tackle the valve adjustment and stuff tomorrow. I'm tired and disgusted right now.

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I don't think your 505's ABS worked very well then... :) Mine is fantastic - better than my 2000 V70R for sure, silent, and just an ever so slight pulsing in the pedal when it's working.

Today was a busy car day. Fixed the boost issue om my 505 Turbo (it was the fricken compressor to electrovalve line), quick exterior wash, and I blasted the underside of the car and engine to get a clean baseline for monitoring leaks.

Grabbed the V70R and gave it a VERY thorough and long overdue exterior wash. Clay bar'd it, then second wash. Hoping to power polish it tomorrow morning and then wax it. Last week I discovered the vibration at high speed it had wasn't drivet shaft like I suspected - but it was two really bent wheels... I just had them straightened this spring when I got new tires installed, but we hit a huge pothole at highway speed on the family trip and that impact must have dented them big time. (Didn't notice it until over 110 KPH) Front passenger side was out of round by a good 1/2"! My buddy Gord owns a wheel refinishing place (thank God!) and he straightened them out for me. Spun them all to make sure they were all good, and rebalanced them to make sure.

Tonight I detailed the rims (2pc BBS wheels), and fixed some curb rash (again - had just fixed them this spring) and got them ready to install after I finish polishing the car. (I put the winters on while I got the rims fixed.)

Only other thing was to find a piece of plywood so that I can pin the spare 505 Turbo engine wiring harness to. Need to figure out a good way to secure it to the board so that I can lay it all out and detail / label all the ends.

Tons more stuff to do... Another big car day is planned.

Rabin

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My busy car day ended up being a frustrating parts finding mission. Killed 2 hours looking for some plastic one use fasteners for the tailgate panel in the V70R. I replaced the bottom ones using plastic pop in screw mounts and screws, and padded all the contact points with foam rubber weatherstripping. Damn tailgate squeaks and drives me NUTS...

Had a family supper then a bunch of us went to Batman at IMAX - pure awesome!

Need to get a bunch of stuff done today. Swap the summer tires back onto the Volvo, new tailgate struts, and a quick detail wash and dry. I was going to power polish it - but I have a rotary polisher with a wool pad - did some research and I should really get a DA polisher, or at the very least some new foam pads with proper compounds.

I should really practice on a couple other cars before the Volvo! My 89 will be good practice - it's getting new paint eventually anyway.

Rabin

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My assault on the garage has had its ups and downs this weekend. After tackling the battery tray on the 'Lude, I endeavored to replace the driver's side axle shaft since it had a torn CV joint boot. Well, it completely fell apart, so my timing was impeccable. The trouble is that I couldn't get what was left of the inner CV joint to disengage from the intermediate shaft. Remember Honda engines spin "backward" and sit transversely "backward", so the intermediate shaft is on the driver LH side, not the RH side like every other FWD car on the planet.

After much prying, pounding, and profanity, I removed the intermediate shaft from the car and proceeded to work on it with my 40" pry bar and a sledge hammer. Still nothing. There is a circlip on the end of the axle that holds it inside the intermediate shaft, but it's supposed to come apart with a bit of a pry. This one is just fused in there. I ended up nearly destroying it, and still no dice. So I ordered a new intermediate shaft :(

I wasn't too discouraged and continued working--adjusting the valves, stripping the valve cover (with Aircraft Remover) and painting it a nice satin black, installing a stock intake system to replace the noisy "hot air intake" the previous owner installed. I also pressure washed the engine bay and underneath. Ever since buying a pressure washer, I can't help but use it for everything :P

The car currently has H&R "race drop" lowering springs, but I bought some Ground Controls that I need to install. I'll do that after I get the new intermediate shaft and axle installed. I hope to have the car ready for an HPDE weekend in October.

Other than that I changed the oil on the CBR954, and cleaned/adjusted the chain. That poor chain is nearing the end of its life, but it has a lot of miles on it (34,000). That's about twice what most people on a literbike get out of a chain. I think it comes down to just pedantic maintenance habits :)

If Dave ends up buying my Peugeot and it has to make a road trip up to NJ, I figured I'd prep it as best as I could. I bought some ATF to flush the transmission and some coolant to flush the cooling system. I haven't touched either since I've owned the car (2/2012). The ATF and coolant are full, but I don't know their service history, so I figure it's good insurance. I changed the oil in it about 1,000 miles ago and it hasn't used or leaked so much as a drop since then.

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If Dave ends up buying my Peugeot and it has to make a road trip up to NJ,

Looking more and more likely all the time now. It's supposed to rain for the next few days so I don't know how much more dis-assembly I'll be able to get done. But barring some surprising revelation I think I'll be seeing you soon. :)

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Well, I prepped the garage for the headgasket job. Started tearing down my spare N9T. I have two Payen HGs. I'll be bying a Meillor and BGA for comparison.

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spent the day working on the house, tiling and painting. i know rabin feels my pain. :)

the only peugeot-related thing i did was buy some parts. i found a guy in france who sells the fuel filler neck gasket, he got back to me today on price & shipping...i bought two, they were 6 euros apiece and shipping for the two was 12 euros...so all in all, about US$30. i'm talking about this part:

IMG_7971.jpg

i also got an email today from the french & italian car show, it's in november...has a year gone by already? :o i decided that i am going to show my car this year even if i have to tow it to the show. as bad off as it is, it won't be the worst car in the show. :D

andré

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I got my Volvo tailgate fixed - no more squeaks! There were these rubber mounts that hold the tailgate and one side was missing. A while back I found these rubber hole mount bushings. so I modified the stock mounts to take them with a M6 bolt and it worked perfectly. Replaced the tailgate struts and it's completely silent now. Car feels SO much better - and of course my wife commented that the squeak didn't even bother her much... Cleaned up my freshly fixed BBS wheels and swapped them on - car looks amazing all cleaned up.

Some SOB's egged my truck - so gave it a thorough wash. Just need to detail the interior a bit and it goes up for sale right away..

No Peugeot work at all today - but I did pick up some storage bins (garage clean up), and some aluminum angle alloy as I think I figured out how to mount the Provent 200 into the 505 Turbo. While working on the boost I noticed a fair bit of oil in the intake, so I made up my mind to fit the Provent I got a while back. Not a lot of room, and the unit is plastic so I wanted it to get good airflow and be away from the exhaust manifold. Not a lot of space so I gave up trying to fit it a while back, so figured I'd install it when I rebuilt the motor. Spent some time noodling around with mounting ideas and I think I found something that will work nicely.

Hopefully I can get another year or so out of the engine as is so that I can get the wheel and brake upgrade done and sorted first.

Need to prep a diff to go into it now and it should be good to go for when I sell the F150.

Rabin

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Today I tracked down the last of the fluid leaks on the Prelude. The high pressure power steering hose is routed more or less over top of the exhaust manifold, wrapped in a massive heat shield contraption. Over time a small amount of power steering fluid would emerge from one end of the heat shield. Since all of the engine oil leaks have been addressed, this one was really bugging me. Discovered that the hose inside the heat shield is cracked and swollen on a few spots, and fluid oozes out. Ordered a new one to the tune of one million dollars.

There also appears to be a small transmission fluid leak and I can't tell if it's coming from one of the shifter lever seals or from the left output shaft seal and being flung upward. Either way, I ordered both seal sets. Just a few bucks, why not.

Could it be that I might end up with one of the few Hondas on the road that doesn't leak any fluid?! Probably so, just in time for the Mayan calendar to end.

I flushed the coolant on the Peugeot. I didn't drain the block but I got everything else and even flushed some distilled water through afterward. Once drained again I filled it with a 50/50 coolant/distilled water mix and got all the air out.

I also drained and refilled the ATF. The ATF that came out looked pretty decent surprisingly--still red. In the process of doing this, I had to undo the deteriorating soundproofing panel under the transmission. It was held on by a combination of its own fasteners plus some bungee cords and safety wire. It's falling apart, so I just left it off the car, threw it in the trunk. It belongs in a museum as it is one of two such panels I've ever seen in real life. Seems most of them are long gone by now :(

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In the process of doing this, I had to undo the deteriorating soundproofing panel under the transmission. It was held on by a combination of its own fasteners plus some bungee cords and safety wire. It's falling apart, so I just left it off the car, threw it in the trunk. It belongs in a museum as it is one of two such panels I've ever seen in real life. Seems most of them are long gone by now :(

Is that what that was with the bungee cord in the picture? I was crawling around under my car trying to identify what was collapsing there. I don't ever remember having that. Was that only on the automatic transmission or is my memory from 27 years ago just fuzzy (or both)?

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Any chance you can take a pic of said contraption? Might be interesting to make a new version for my car eventually - I'd really like to get NVH levels as low as possible so my wife doesn't make any smelly tractor comments about it!

Yesterday I unpacked parts. LOTS of parts I've been buying and acquiring for the last few months and they remained stacked unpacked in my garage. Picked up some nice plastic storage containers so last night I did my best to unpack everything and get an initial sort done.

Spent 4 hours in the garage basically unpacking and giggling to myself. I've been purchasing stuff for 3 projects simultaneously - and I don't recommend it! XD3T engine and wagon parts, N9TEA engine and sedan parts, and XN6 and 504 body/lighting parts. I NEED to get my garage purged and these parts organized so that I can actually enjoy fitting them to the the cars.

Rabin

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Yeah all of the bungee cords and crap hanging down is/was the sound proofing panel. I believe all 1985-86 diesels had it regardless of transmission; There's even a blurb in the owners manual about how to remove it during service work.

There are catches on the "frame rails" lining the transmission which it locks into. It is fastened to the engine crossmember with two 10mm bolts. On most of the late diesels I worked on as a technician, the catches were often still on the car, though most of the time they had been crushed by people lifting the car from the frame rails.

I noticed that the car does seem a bit louder without it there, so even though it was in shabby condition, it obviously made some difference.

When I worked at Sunset Coachmen, we had a pristine '85 XD3T 5 speed sedan with something like 50,000 original miles. Its soundproofing panel was in perfect shape. That was such a perfect car overall. I wonder what ever became of it.

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I lost my damn cell phone. Spent the evening looking for it. lol

Rabin

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i changed the transmission filter and replaced the atf in my jetta (4-speed automatic) today. i had noticed that it was shifting a little slow, and when i had problems with my fuel pump a few weeks ago and took it to the dealer, they confirmed that it was time to do this so it's been on my to-do list since then.

i hadn't done this task on this car yet (88k miles, owned it since new) but it was a lot easier than i though it would be. as usual, the hardest part was disposing of the old fluid. there's an auto parts store about a half-mile from my house (pep boys) and they accept old oil for recycling, so i took it there. at first the counter guy didn't think they took atf, but one of the mechanics said they did so he took it from me; it was only about 3 liters.

on the manual-transmissioned jettas of my car's vintage (2002), the differential shares its fluid supply with the transmission but the automatics like mine have a separate lubricant reservoir for the diff so i'll be doing that next (after my trip to norcal this weekend); the blogs (vwvortex, etc.) all say that it's easier to do this job with a fluid extractor so that's now on my shopping list...that'll also come in handy when i flush the transmission on my 505. any recommendations?

also, while i was under there i noticed that the driver's side cv boot looked bad, so that's on the list. also, when i changed the brakes a while back i didn't sufficiently lube the front passenger side caliper so it's been sticking, causing the pads on that wheel to stick and wear faster than normal. so that's on the list, too.

andré

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i hadn't done this task on this car yet (88k miles, owned it since new) but it was a lot easier than i though it would be. as usual, the hardest part was disposing of the old fluid. there's an auto parts store about a half-mile from my house (pep boys) and they accept old oil for recycling, so i took it there. at first the counter guy didn't think they took atf, but one of the mechanics said they did so he took it from me; it was only about 3 liters.

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Fluid extractor - That'll also come in handy when i flush the transmission on my 505. any recommendations?

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also, while i was under there i noticed that the driver's side cv boot looked bad, so that's on the list. also, when i changed the brakes a while back i didn't sufficiently lube the front passenger side caliper so it's been sticking, causing the pads on that wheel to stick and wear faster than normal. so that's on the list, too.

andré

Couple things - if you just drained the ATF pan you've only changed a fraction of the oil in the system. For the Volvo there's some nice instructions to undo the top tranny cooler line at the radiator that you attach a clear vinyl hose to and run into a container. You start the car and run it until the it has pumped 2L into the container, you then top up with fresh ATF and repeat until the fluid runs clear. This ensures fresh fluid is entirely run through the transmission - 12L on my Volvo. At $15/L for the AMSOIL universal ATF it's pricey - but then again it's a pricey bit of hardware and I don't mind running the best I can in it.

On 505's the diff and the auto tranny has a drain plug so no need for an extractor (Although you need to pull the pan off the auto to do the filter anyway) To fill the diff I got one of those funnels with the hose that attaches, then replaced the hose with a longer one. I then hang the funnel beside the rear tire and the hose routed in through the rear wheel well. Fill up is way nicer then messing around with other fluid transfer devices. (Been there, done that!). Only thing easier is having a 45L pail of the stuff with a pump - I have that too - but for conventional ATF and gear oil - neither of which I use in my cars anymore. For the transmission I'm quite sure the same Volvo trick to flush out the ATF will work - I just need to verify which transmission line at the rad to use - one would assume it would be the top line as well.

CV boots - highly recommend OEM boot kits if you want to install them yourself and they haven't opened up. If the axle is torn and grease is gone I'd recommend replacing the whole joint or the whole axle. Jobber replacments NEVER last as long as OEM. I had a car that had lifetime warranty on the rebuilt units - but I was replacing them every year. For my last Subaru I bought OEM boot kits and redid all four axles and I had no issues in over 5 years of daily driving.

Rabin

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Couple things - if you just drained the ATF pan you've only changed a fraction of the oil in the system.

well, since i was also changing the transmission filter, and that's under the pan, i pulled the pan as well. for this task, i got all of my supplies as a kit from ecs tuning, they sell stuff for german cars. the kit included the atf, filter (with new seal), new pan gasket & torque limiters (i.e., spacers for the gasket), new drain plug and new fill plug (the transmission fill plug on the jetta is a one-time use deal). based on everything that i've read, i expected to get 3 liters out of the transmission and that's what i got...the capacity of the vw 01M automatic transmission is only 3.2 liters! the transmission funnel that i have has a valve in it, so you can fill the top of the funnel (which is clear with measurement markings), then open the valve and add a precise amount of atf.

with my 505, i'm planning to do a full flush of the transmission. i had read about doing the flush as a continuous process, with the output going into a container and new atf being added continuously until the output runs clear...i like your 2-liter-at-a-time method, as it reduces the chances of messing up your transmission if you don't add fluid quickly enough. i got 3 liters of the dex ii, but i can see that i'm going to need lots more. given that the capacity of the 4hp22 transmission is 2.6 liters, how many more liters would you recommend?

as for the cv boots, i'm thinking i'm going to just replace the axle in the coming weeks with an oem part. i'm starting to feel a very faint steering wheel pull under braking on occasion, which on this car means it'll soon be time for a new left axle anyway.

andré

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I should know better to doubt your research of a task. I did some quick googling as my first reaction was "3.2L - No way!"... I've never heard of an auto tranny with that low of a capacity. (I was blown away when I found out old Honda's took 3.5L of engine oil back in the day). Only found this article that mentions his method took 4.5L: http://faculty.ccp.edu/faculty/dreed/Campingart/jettatech/01m.pdf - but no flushing per se.

Does the VW not have an external oil cooler for the tranny? I'm surprised that it just looks like you drop the oil in the tranny and no flushing out of the internals is done.

The flushing amount needed to get the tranny fluid and the capacity isn't really a proper comparison - Pretty sure the capacity of my V70R tranny is ~6L, but flushing out the old oil and getting it visually clean took 12L. First time I did it I only bought 10L - and it was starting to turn clean, but not completely clean. This past summer I got 2L of Mobil 3309 to use first as part of the flush - then used the synthetic ATF to finish it off.

For the 4HP22 - I was going to do the 2L method until it was clean - likely get 10L of oil, but will likely use cheaper oil to flush the first few cycles out. (or a cheaper synthetic at least that's Dex II compliant)

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the trans cooler on my engine/transmission assembly is in a weird place -- it's above the transmission instead of on the front of the assembly as you'd expect. i imagine that this was done to to make for an efficient powertrain package & save a few steps during the car's manufacture. it also has the advantage of placing the trans cooler in the exact right spot to bang your knuckles when you are working on the starter. <_<

the trans cooler is also pretty small. so i can't imagine it's super-effective, what with it being small and out of the cold air flow like that. ecs tuning and other places sell an upgraded trans cooler, but i can't help thinking that anybody who cares about performance that much would have probably just gotten a manual transmission. :D it's probably a worthwhile upgrade to extend the life of the transmission, though, so i'll probably add it at some point in the future...

interesting factoid -- vw golf/jetta models for the US market are typically built in mexico...my wagon is a 2002, the first year for that bodystyle in the US...for whatever, reason, in 2002 the wagons were made in germany. so i have a german-made car. :)

i'm glad you mentioned the use-cheaper-stuff-to-flush-out-the-transmission method -- i've read about this in other places but i can't seem to get my head around it. so you run the cheap stuff through until it runs clear...then what? how do you know when you've replaced the cheap stuff with the good stuff? if you could explain this in a little more detail, i'd appreciate it...

andré

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Fixed the slightly messed up Right taillight wiring harness, now it's time to sort out the problem on the circuit causing my speakers to not work (have any volume).

BTW, who's coming to the meet on Saturday?

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the trans cooler on my engine/transmission assembly is in a weird place -- it's above the transmission instead of on the front of the assembly as you'd expect. i imagine that this was done to to make for an efficient powertrain package & save a few steps during the car's manufacture. it also has the advantage of placing the trans cooler in the exact right spot to bang your knuckles when you are working on the starter. <_<

the trans cooler is also pretty small. so i can't imagine it's super-effective, what with it being small and out of the cold air flow like that. ecs tuning and other places sell an upgraded trans cooler, but i can't help thinking that anybody who cares about performance that much would have probably just gotten a manual transmission. :D it's probably a worthwhile upgrade to extend the life of the transmission, though, so i'll probably add it at some point in the future...

interesting factoid -- vw golf/jetta models for the US market are typically built in mexico...my wagon is a 2002, the first year for that bodystyle in the US...for whatever, reason, in 2002 the wagons were made in germany. so i have a german-made car. :)

i'm glad you mentioned the use-cheaper-stuff-to-flush-out-the-transmission method -- i've read about this in other places but i can't seem to get my head around it. so you run the cheap stuff through until it runs clear...then what? how do you know when you've replaced the cheap stuff with the good stuff? if you could explain this in a little more detail, i'd appreciate it...

andré

Sounds like most of the oil in the system will drain out with just the pan removal / draining, but I've always thought a proper flush to get as much as possible out for the first time you should really run it through the tranny like the volvo flush method. I had ~80K on the first flush, so decided to redo it with another complete flush. They're known to be delicate transmissions so ensuring it has top quality clean oil was worth it to me.

As for using "cheap" oil ($10/L) - I only used two litres first thing with the thought that it would be sufficently diluted and flushed out after running another 10L of the fresh AMSOIL into it. It only saved $10 using the Mobil - but still worthwhile I figured. Most guys just use the Mobil stuff - but I really like the AMSOIL and have yet to have any issues with my transmission (knocks on wood).

Cool factoid about it being German built - I know that will have some value come resale time for sure! BTW - not sure if you mentioned it - but is your car a 1.8T engine? Or?

Rabin

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Last night I replaced the power steering line on the Prelude; the one that has been oozing fluid thanks to a poorly wrapped header and an even poorer hose routing choice by Honda. Replacing this hose was worse than doing taxes, or sitting through an episode of The Bachelorette with my girlfriend. It needlessly snakes over the exhaust/header, to the RH side of the end, then down under the intake manifold to meet the pinion valve, with the last 12 inches or so an impossibly bent hard line that must somehow loop around the crossmember and weave between some other hard lines.

Today I replaced one of the small coolant lines that looked a bit frail (though wasn't leaking), as well as the drive axle seals on the transaxle and one of the shifter shaft seals. I believe (knock on wood), that the car is completely leak free. Impossible for a 22 year old Honda? I hope not.

While screwing around with the axles, I noticed the lower ball joint boots were perished, though the ball joints themselves were alright. I removed the old boots, cleaned the ball joints, repacked with synthetic grease, and fitted some new urethane ball joint boots. Good as new!

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Nice Boat Dave! My father-in-law had a 22' Tanzer that we sailed on for years, but with growing families he sold it and bought a 21' Pontoon boat. I miss the sailing - but getting everyone on board in comfort is pretty cool. Just came back from the lake, but it was too windy both days to get on the water. So we had to make do with exploring the beaches.

Came home to find a guy wanting to check out the F150 I have for sale so I quickly detailed the interior before he arrived. Hoping it sells soon - the repaint on the 89' depends on it selling.

Rabin

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Nice Boat Dave!

Not my boat, but my friend who owns it pretty much only takes it out if I can come along. He relies on both my sailing and mechanical skills. He really is competent at both but seems to feel uncomfortable without me there. There's a lot of advantages to being able to sail a lot without having to own a boat. This is a Columbia 28.

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You've all been far more productive than I! Last Wednesday I finally removed the alternator from the 505 and took it for a rebuild. That is the extent of any car related activity for me in the last 2 weeks. If time allows I may hit an open track day next Wednesday in Topeka, but it would require quite a bit of motivation on my part to load up the Miata, the spares, tools and so on plus get 4 tires mounted. You can guess the likelihood of it actually happening.....

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