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Mike T

1966 404 Coupé Injection Restoration

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Other side's done.  Saturday I"ll do some final trunk trimming and then move onto the door panel pre-fitting/installation.

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Since then I've mounted the forward side panels, put some black carpet-like insulation behind the Sofica heater unit and re-threaded the two stripped driver's seat captive nuts.  This coming weekend the headliner should be professionally installed and then I can do the front and rear glass (I hope, without help).

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Heater controls mounted - all silver cadmium plated

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Both rear quarter panel trims were mounted.

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New headliner mounted.  Front part is not mounted because the windshield has to go in first.  That's one of the next tasks: front and rear windshields.

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Everything coming together. Headliner is looking very nice Mike. 

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It is interesting to me how this 404 is built, the insolation, construction, rubber floor mats, it reminds me of Fiat's and Lada's from that time. That said you really are doing quality job restoring and reassembly it and that body color, that deep blue in the photos really looks good.

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New carpets custom made for the 404C by Geoff Chrysler in Highlands BC. Wilton wool.

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Seat slides (NOS) hand painted in Krylon semi-gloss after tidying up.

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Upper door replica panel for a Cabriolet modified by me to fit the Coupé and it worked reasonably well.  The shape difference is quite remarkable and quite a bit of work was needed.
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The panel completely installed, taken from inside the car with the door closed.
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This looks sharp, great job, fantastic !

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Jenn (one of our three adult kids) picked up the carpets from Geoff in Highlands Friday afternoon, as well as a roll of trunk lining.  The carpets were test-fitted without the sound deadening insulation in place so it looks a bit baggy.  Also, the bit of fibreglass that's visible behind the shifter hole will have blue vinyl glued to it.  It's fine and will look most excellent when the car is done!

The trunk insulation is essentially a protectant that is glued onto the inside of the rear panel of the car and the inside of the rear fenders. The material is a fibrous mat with bonded pebbled vinyl, a good approximation of the original stuff.  If a suitcase or anything else shifts in a corner, the padding will prevent my (NEW!!) fenders from being dented from the inside out.

Lastly, I ordered some new sill trim clips from Le Club 404 because the ones I had bought from them about 25 years ago were damaged during the test fitting of the trim to the 404C in the primer stage.  The little teeth that grip the seam were brittle and some snapped off after it was removed.  So I ordered a second set, from a revised batch from Le Club 404 a few weeks ago.  The material is spring steel, which means they should be reusable, but as you can see, they were rusty.  So I had them cadmium plated (not cheap, but far better than paint) and I will have to RE&RE the sill stainless steel trims soon to put these on.

Carpet.jpg

Carpet test fit.jpg

Trunk lining.jpg

Rusty Rocker Clips.jpg

plated sill clips.jpg

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I had not stored the car sensitively when I had it for 28 years in the garage, with the brakes last being bled in about 1991.  So when I disassembled the car in 2016, the cylinders all looked awful and I thought they might be toast.  Turned out they're not.

 

New Cunifer brake piping - all metal lines will be replaced.  Hydraulic hand tool to double and bubble flare en route from USA right now.  You can see the brake cylinders before cleaning and painting.

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Rear brake proportioning valve piston - L=NOS (not so good); R=original (quite good).  So the old valve will go back in the car. 

Piston derail proportioning valves.jpg

 

The two complete proportioning valves disassembled.  The one with paint is the NOS one.

Old and new Proportioning Valves.jpg

Painted front wheel cylinders, which came up nicely after a hone.

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The old proportioning valve with the sealing nut off, showing how the piston appears.  It was moving smoothly!

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Rear wheel cylinders (tiny bore, 16 mm) repainted and kits galore available to replace all the wear items. 

Rear wheel cylinders.jpg

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I used this new S.U.R.&R. PFT409 brake flaring tool.....
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....to make my first ever brake line:
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And wow is that tool ever amazing!  Perfect DIN bubble flare every time.  The pistol grip tool is hydraulic.  Expensive but worth it if only for the knowledge that I can't mess up.

This line is the one that connects the two front Thermostable brake cylinders.

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Brake lines are done, except for one little one that I need to buy two more unions to make.

brake lines.jpg

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Jute-backed vinyl sound deadening glued onto cowl panel today. I also cleaned up the front brake cylinder springs and reassembled the rear brake proportioning valve.

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That is not a lot of hard brake lines. Always use box line wrench on the brass fittings and get them as tight as you can, they need to seal, i can't count how many times i've had to fix brakes that someone else has changed lines and ether used wrong fittings or hasn't tighten the lines hard enough. Always use two wrenches when tighten lines so you won't bend the brackets. Otherwise you are doing a great job, do you have a timeline in main to get the braking system finished.

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The fittings aren't brass, they're cadmium plated steel.  Brass is too soft.  The procedure for working on brake lines is well known to me.  The main outstanding item is that the Hydrovac booster needs to be sent out early in 2020 for a rebuild in the eastern USA.  It was NOS in 1993 but has been on the car for 26 years.

A new OEM master cylinder and some additional brake kits and sealing washers are on their way to me from Germany as we speak.  Then I'll have all I need to complete the work.

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Yeah, Old OEM parts on cooling and braking systems are no good, i've recently found out that even never used parts in OE packaging go bad over time, staff like brake cylinders, boosters, pumps dry rot easily when not used everyday. Working on the Little Niva has been a joy in that aspect, because is still being made, and russia is not too far away i can buy parts couple weeks old and they fit and work way better and every single thing is available. Keep the updates coming i love seeing the beautiful work you are doing.

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More Cunifer line - seamless - bought, this time for the fuel lines (supply and return).  I'll bend them up and mount them this weekend.  Diameter is 5/16 inch (about 7.95 mm).

Fuel line bulk.jpg

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$25 buys this Mercedes-Benz W115 manual shifter boot, perfectly sized for the Nardi floor shifter of the Peugeot 404.  Super soft rubber.  The one on the right is the old boot from the car.  Just got it today in Victoria.  Mounted it in the new carpet when I got home.  Trimmed off the thick part of the rim from below, but the rings are perfect!1409573257_Shiftbootincarpet.thumb.jpg.80ec424d0da6e6142dc6113a08abb30c.jpg

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Shift boot in carpet 2.jpg

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Visible, it sits in the hole in the transmission tunnel carpet.  I added a couple of photos to show that after I got home.

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Bent up the 8 mm copper-nickel tubing for the 2 fuel lines  - using the old ones as a template and zap strapping them together during the bending.
 
Then I mounted all the hard brake and fuel lines under the car.  In the process I cleaned the garage floor, with my hair.  6 hours all in.

Making a fuel line.jpg

Front brake splitter.jpg

Fuel pipe details 1.jpg

Proportioning valve mounted.jpg

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