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Endrulf

N9TE Engine Rebuild

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Hi,

I'm planning to rebuild the engine for my 1986 Peugeot 505 2.2 Turbo Injection. 
I want to make the engine good for around 400+ HP and I'm looking for the following parts: 
 

- Cylinder head gasket (reinforced)

- Engine gasket kit

- Set of 8 connecting rod bearings

- Set of 10 half crankshaft bearings 

- Adjustable fuel pressure regulator

- Simple distribution kit (chain + tensioner)

- ARP studs for the cylinderhead

 

Do you guys know where I can buy quality parts for my N9TE?
I know of www.politecnic.com but they dont got everything I need :(

 

Where you do guy buy your 505Ti parts? 


I already have the Garrett GT3076R turbo, custom forged nascar-spec pistons with gapless rings, ARP conrod bolts etc.

If you know any other parts or things that might be useful to replace/upgrade, please let me know. 

 

Cheers

Endre

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Welcome Endre!

Arp doesn't make head studs, but I just added this topic that covers options in detail:  

I figured the most cost effective option is the one that uses Porsche 944 head stud nuts with the ARP fasteners.

The other parts are very rare, but these guys came to the rescue a while back: https://www.mespiecesauto.com/?swoof=1&product_cat=peugeot-505-turbo-injection

Big question now will be what your plan is for standalone engine management system and tuning?  Injectors?  Plans for exhaust manifold?  Any changes to the intake manifold?

Pictures of the parts so far would be awesome as well.

Rabin

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Thank you for your reply @Bean, and your post about head studs!


My plan for the engine management system is to use Electronic fuel injection with bigger injectors. Haven't decided on a brand yet, that depends a bit on what brand the "tuning-guy" prefers!

Currently I dont have any particular plans for the exhaust manifold.
As for the intake manifold I hope to reuse the original intake, maybe give it to a guy to enhance the flow-rate.

Cheers,
Endre

 

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The T3 on the car has a proprietary turbo flange - so does the 3076 fit the stock exhaust housing?  If so most are .36 A/R with only the 89' turbo getting the slightly larger .48 A/R housing.

If the 3076 has the stock T3 flange then you'll either need to mod the stock manifold by welding the T3 flange on, or go with a custom manifold.

Some have gone with a custom T3/T4 hybrid using the stock housing as well which makes things a little easier as well.

Standalone done here have been Megasquirt, I decided to go with VEMS a few years back, but I also picked up an SDS system a while back for my 505 sw8.

Injectors I'd recommend Injector Dynamics as you need to run pretty big injectors and ID's have great reputation for quality.  Bosch are always nice too - I've got some green giants (465cc) for the wagon.

Rabin

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Where are you located, Endre?

I bought my parts from https://www.mespiecesauto.com/?swoof=1&product_cat=peugeot-505-turbo-injection

 

My engine now has the forged rods as well, but original pistons.
And currently my clutch is in USA, so spec clutch can spesial make one for me, as they didnt have anything that fit the car.

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^^ Curious why you used rods and not pistons?  Rods are supposed to be factory forged - but the pistons have a reputation of being fairly weak...

I've never heard of a rod failure,  but I could definitely see it if you wanted yo lighten them - factory rods are quite heavy!

Rabin

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On 1/7/2019 at 4:15 AM, Bean said:

^^ Curious why you used rods and not pistons?  Rods are supposed to be factory forged - but the pistons have a reputation of being fairly weak...

I've never heard of a rod failure,  but I could definitely see it if you wanted yo lighten them - factory rods are quite heavy!

Rabin

My engine had a rod knock, so I needed new rods anyway.
Regarding pistons, I have never needed to change pistons on my turbo builds (not Peugeot btw). And I´ve always used original head gaskets.
So I never saw the reason to do that in this engine either.
Mostly it´s about adjusting for the correct AFR and advance. And hope that not old exhaust valves brake.
Are these sodium filled btw? Or are they stainless or something else?

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The North America 1985 505 Turbo cars had sodium exhaust valves and a .48 A/R turbo with no water cooling.  In 86 they got rid of the sodium filled valves and went with a smaller .36 A/R watercooled turbo.

Pistons should be fine with MS3X, but they do not tolerate detonation at all which was usually because of wastegate failure and overboosting.  Overboost switch delayed it if it was functional - but often they failed or simply not connected.

Lots of N9T** motors died that way.

With proper fueling and engine management I think these motors will make very good power. 

Rabin

 

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8 hours ago, Bean said:

The North America 1985 505 Turbo cars had sodium exhaust valves and a .48 A/R turbo with no water cooling.  In 86 they got rid of the sodium filled valves and went with a smaller .36 A/R watercooled turbo.

Pistons should be fine with MS3X, but they do not tolerate detonation at all which was usually because of wastegate failure and overboosting.  Overboost switch delayed it if it was functional - but often they failed or simply not connected.

Lots of N9T** motors died that way.

With proper fueling and engine management I think these motors will make very good power. 

Rabin

 

Regarding proper fueling etc, thats my thought as well. And also I have read somewhere that the cars have had a tendency to run lean when original? That can very easy create problems. I will probably run this car with a wideband lambda from day one. So I have full control of what´s going on with this old system before I think of using the car hard. Even before I start changing the turbo and ecu etc.

Regarding sodium valves. They can often break when under hard strain. And of course result in catastrophic consequences for the engine as a whole.

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Never heard of any valves breaking, reason mentioned many times was that it didn't justify the cost.

Fully agree about them running lean - especially here as we got even lower flowing fuel injectors (~280cc/min).

Standalone management of boost control is another big advantage over stock.

Rabin

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