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Hello everyone!

 

 

Some of you may remember my last project (505 GTI V6) that also has a short video on Youtube. I don’t know why or how that video has achieved 100k views, but nevertheless I decided it would be a major milestone and it is worth celebrating it with the revealing of my latest project.

This project began immediately after my GTI V6 project was roadworthy. Since I felt it lacked power to make it something very special, it would need some upgrading. As I further investigated different options, I figured out that I would need a charger of some sort for my power hunger. Now, with the V6 I would need every required part custom made and since I had a 205 GTI as my daily driver back then I stumbled upon the Mi16 and S16. Those are probably one the most over designed engines for a normal car like 405 or 306, and they pack a huge potential.

Don’t get me wrong, custom parts are not the issue for the V6, but I would prefer to keep the V6 naturally aspired and since parts for Mi16 and S16 are readily available I thought maybe I would try to make my version of the 505 Turbo updated to 21st century. A Peugeot 505 T16, yes, that would be what I need…

 

At this point I would like to point out that this project is still on-going but I would prefer to tell the project history from the beginning up to this date.

 This project was properly started over 3 years ago (2015) when I bought a Citroen Xsara 2.0 VTS which had the same engine that Peugeot 306 GTI-6 has (Xu10j4rs). The car was almost totaled, but I would only need the engine to be in reasonable condition. As the cars body was in bad condition, the seller did list it at somewhat cheap price. Since the Xu10j4rs engine is demanded engine in amateur racing leagues in Finland, I knew I need to act fast if I would want to get it before some amateur racing team would buy it. I contacted the seller right away when she listed it and I went to see the car in the next day.

The car was in a bad shape, but I didn’t even go for a test drive, I just started the engine and revved it couple of times and the feeling of the engine had me convicted it is in a decent shape. After all, I would strip it completely and rebuild it with new parts. The car was LOUD since the exhaust pipe was also broken just after the cat. After signing the papers, I drove the Xsara to my house. It was heavily snowing, so 150 km with broken exhaust, a plastic bag as a side window and without functioning air conditioning blower was far from a enjoyable trip, but I didn’t have time to get a trailer and someone with a license to tow the trailer.

 

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The trip back to home went well regardless the circumstances. As I got it parked, it stayed there for almost a year since I was busy with other stuff.

In late 2016 I salvaged the engine and the rear axle along with some other parts from the Xsara and scrapped the rest. I stripped the engine completely and took the head, block and crankshaft to an engine specialist, who washed, checked and measured all of the parts. The engine found out to be in an excellent condition, and only the head gasket surface was machined straight, and the valve stem seals were renewed. The casting imperfections from the ports were also removed. The head was also flow benched before and after the port cleanup. I also happened to have an Mi16 head in the shop at the same time and it was also flow benched as I were curious enough to see how they match up.

As the specialist confirmed the engine was in an excellent condition, I placed some orders for parts. I ordered a Wössner Low-compression piston and a PEC H-beam forged connecting rods. The pistons were 0.5 mm oversize as I would have the block re-bored to ensure a proper piston and piston ring clearance. The piston / rod kit took 3 months to arrive as they needed to be made in the Wössner factory as they didn’t have them on stock. I also did order some King Racing bearings for the rod bearings and normal King bearings for the main bearings and Glyco thrusts bearings. Furthermore, I did order a Cometic head gasket, but it didn’t fit properly on the Xu10j4rs. As for gaskets, I did order a full set from Elring.

When the piston / rod set arrived in the February 2017, I could send the pistons along with the block to an engine machining shop for the re-boring. The block was re-bored to 0.5 mm oversize and the block head gasket surface was levelled. After the re-bore, I painted the block red. Although the block had been re-bored, and I did have the parts, I needed to machine the bearing housing for the clutch shaft bearing in the crankshaft. I did this with one of my friend’s lathe as the machining shop would rip me off for such a job.

 

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 I did blank the oil routes with tape before doing any machining althought it is not done yet in the picture. After machining the bearing housing, I could finally start to put the engine back together with the new parts

As I wanted to properly tighten the ARP 2000 connecting rod bolts, I would need a stretch gauge to measure the bolts stretch. I ended up fabricating one on my own along with an calibration part. Unfortunately I dont have a picture of it at the moment.

 

As soon as I had my stretch gauge calibrated, I could assemble the bottom end of the engine with the new parts.

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At this point, I also had almost compeleted the assembly of Megasquirt 2 with coil-on-plug modifications: (Sorry for un-focused picture)

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As for summer 2017 I didn't get much done except fitting the top-end for the engine after measuring the compression ratio and valve timings. I did use a elring MLS head gasket and ARP head stud set. For the late 2017 I ordered a clutch and flywheel set along with billet aux pulley from TTV Racing.

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The last thing I managed to do in 2017 was the alternator and powersteering pump bracket. The original cast iron was way too heavy since I dont need the upper engine mount anymore. I ended up doing it from 8 mm and 10 mm stainless steel rods welded together with TIG.

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That concludes the progress to end of the 2017. I will continue with the 2018 and 2019 progress in my next big post this or next week. Please feel free to ask any questions regarding the pictures, the story or anything else related to the project, I'm more than happy to answer to them.

And yes, the car itself is going get restorated in the early 2018 and the project will take huge leaps compared to the previous years progress speed.

 

Best Regards,

WalesRR

 

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Oh man - I'm more excited to see what you did in 2018+ than I am to know what happens in Marvel's "Endgame" movie!

The new brackets you made for the ancillary engine components are genius - I've never seen them done like that.

Rabin

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9 hours ago, Bean said:

Oh man - I'm more excited to see what you did in 2018+ than I am to know what happens in Marvel's "Endgame" movie!

The new brackets you made for the ancillary engine components are genius - I've never seen them done like that.

Rabin

These type of brackets are common here in the states, as a matter of fact I helped my buddy this weekend on he’s 8 sec DSM to make similar brackets for he’s trans cooler. 

 

Wonderful build! I personally think that XU10J4RS is the best engine Peugeot ever made (street production engine) definitely looking forward to see this build all the way.

 

 

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I'm just out of touch!  :) I'll have to look for more examples of those types of brackets...  

So looking forward to the update...

Rabin

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Really cool, Peugeot probably made at least one 505 Turbo 16 as a test mule for the 205 Turbo 16 engine.

I'm curious about the way you will mate the XU and the BA10.

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21 hours ago, Bean said:

Oh man - I'm more excited to see what you did in 2018+ than I am to know what happens in Marvel's "Endgame" movie!

The new brackets you made for the ancillary engine components are genius - I've never seen them done like that.

Rabin

Haha, don't get over-excited! I don't want to disappoint anyone, and I think that is the very reason why I need something concretical to show before I post a new project.

12 hours ago, my3AWDgst said:

These type of brackets are common here in the states, as a matter of fact I helped my buddy this weekend on he’s 8 sec DSM to make similar brackets for he’s trans cooler. 

 

Wonderful build! I personally think that XU10J4RS is the best engine Peugeot ever made (street production engine) definitely looking forward to see this build all the way.

 

 

Yes, I think that type of brackets is widely used at least in the custom-made brackets. The only thing I am worried about my bracket, is the vibrations combined to the stainless steels tendency to crack more easily that mild steel. I'll guess we will see how it will turnout in the future. In the worst-case scenario, the bracket breaks, and the auxiliary drive belt slams between the timing belt and the crankshaft pulley and… Well you can guess the rest…

29 minutes ago, SRDT said:

Really cool, Peugeot probably made at least one 505 Turbo 16 as a test mule for the 205 Turbo 16 engine.

I'm curious about the way you will mate the XU and the BA10.

Woah, I really need to find more info on the 505 xu8t test version, in fact, I can also remember seeing something about it somewhere, but I can't say anything about when or where was it.. If anyone has more info about this I would be really grateful about anything regarding to this particular thing.

Spoiler alert!! : About mating the XU/BA10, more information about this is coming when the story reaches January 2019.

17 hours ago, Mike T said:

Nice!

Thank you! I really wish that I could ever achieve the level of detail You and my3AWDgst are putting to your projects! It truly amazes me how one can always make every little part look  even better than the original!

I had time today to write my project's story, so tomorrow this thread will have the next big post that will cover the whole 2018. That means there will be even one more "big post" after that, which wraps January-March 2019 up.

 

-Wales

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46 minutes ago, Wales said:

Haha, don't get over-excited! I don't want to disappoint anyone, and I think that is the very reason why I need something concretical to show before I post a new project.

Yes, I think that type of brackets is widely used at least in the custom-made brackets. The only thing I am worried about my bracket, is the vibrations combined to the stainless steels tendency to crack more easily that mild steel. I'll guess we will see how it will turnout in the future. In the worst-case scenario, the bracket breaks, and the auxiliary drive belt slams between the timing belt and the crankshaft pulley and… Well you can guess the rest…

 

I've learned this lesson all too well - I've got grand ideas, but have a much more difficult time to make them happen!  I still have everything I've posted about thus far, and have gotten even more parts - but alas I'm still searching for time to put things together!

As for the brackets holding the PS pump and alternator - is there another contact point to the block down low under the alternator?  I see the three bolts to the block between the pump and alternator, but can't make out if there's any lower down.  If not - that'd be my concern as that's an awful lot of leverage on the bracket - that's the only concern that comes to mind.

I assume you'll have plans to dyno the set up as well?  REALLY curious to hear what kind of numbers it puts down, along with what the power and torque curves look like...  :)

Do you still have your 3L PRV powered 505?

Rabin

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Almost all test mules end up scraped so if Peugeot made any 505 Turbo 16 it was at best used for testing another engine or two before meeting his end.

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10 hours ago, Bean said:

I've learned this lesson all too well - I've got grand ideas, but have a much more difficult time to make them happen!  I still have everything I've posted about thus far, and have gotten even more parts - but alas I'm still searching for time to put things together!

As for the brackets holding the PS pump and alternator - is there another contact point to the block down low under the alternator?  I see the three bolts to the block between the pump and alternator, but can't make out if there's any lower down.  If not - that'd be my concern as that's an awful lot of leverage on the bracket - that's the only concern that comes to mind.

I assume you'll have plans to dyno the set up as well?  REALLY curious to hear what kind of numbers it puts down, along with what the power and torque curves look like...  :)

Do you still have your 3L PRV powered 505?

Rabin

It is always the race between the time and the money...

About the bracket, there is total of five fix points to the block and two of them is located under the alternator. I'll add a picture later where you can see them.

Yes, of course I am going to dyno it, and I am really looking forward for the actual power/torque curve. In fact, the engine specialist that flow benched the head had some experience about turbocharging the Xu10j4rs, said that reaching the 500 hp should be doable even with stock camshafts and with reasonable low boost levels. I have been aiming for this result when selecting the parts for the build. The clutch is spec'd for 580nm, and all the internal parts should theoretically withstand 800 hp. I am little bit worried about the compression ratio, since Wösnerr claimed it to be 8.0:1, but I measured it to be as low as 7.6:1, which I think is very low, so it would need some boost to push out the horses. But I decided that I will first build it with this setup, and since I'm planning to run it later on E85, I’ll have the compression ratio raised using longer rods and lowering the pistons, since the Wösnerr’s have really deep dome…

EDIT: Yes, of course I still have the 3l 505, but it is waiting for the day I have my own garage and time to restore it in the condition it deserves.

-Wales

Edited by Wales
Forgot to add answer

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Here is the bare bracket:

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I think it would be a good idea to add couple of pictures from the TI in the condition it was when I bought it back in 2013. As you can see, the body has minor rust damage areas and the sun had also done it tricks with the lacquer layer.

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I removed the engine already in 2016.

As the year changed from 2017 to 2018 I was able to start working on the 505 itself as I got to temporarily use more space in my friend’s machine hall. I had been building the engine there for about a year but in January 2018 I got the car itself there indoors and under some bodywork. I stripped the whole interior and removed every powertrain and chassis part. I took the propeller shaft housing, back subframe and the rear track control arms to local paint shop to have them sand blasted and painted black with epoxy-based paint. Unfortunately, I don’t know why I didn’t take any pictures from these, but I’ll try get a picture about them later. Overall, I am amazed why did I take so small number of pictures in the whole 2018...

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While the above listed parts were at the paint shop, I started working with the rust issue. The rusted areas in the trunk had gotten way worse since the day I bought it. After all, I did use this car more or less as my daily driver for about 2 years including the winter time. In the winter they use a lot of road-salt near the city areas in Finland to prevent ice forming on the asphalt, and man does that stuff explode the rustiness to the maximum and beyond. As I mentioned in Alfanatiker’s topic, I were really stunned about the same amount of rustiness and the exact same locations of the rust damage we had at least in the rear part of the car. I ended up changing a lot of metal to new one that doesn’t show on these following pictures. Again, sorry for not taking so much pictures here, but I’ll guess you get the point…

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The rust work took total of 3 months and after welding everything back together, I removed all of the surface rust and the anti-chipping compound under the back of the car using the steel wire brush disc on angle grinder. Then I treated every inch of the bottom of the rear section of the car with rust passivator compound and I painted it with 2 layers of epoxy primer finished with 2 layers of epoxy-based urethane paint.

So, at this point I had only restored metallic structures in the bottom of the rear section of the car, starting from the back-seat floor and ending in the rear bumper. I left the outside (wheel arcs, back wheel skirts) un-touched on purpose at this point, since I am planning to widen the car, so I might need to modify the wheel arcs. I thought I have done already enough of the unnecessary extra work with the rust repairing anyway, I should have changed bigger pieces at the time and not trying to minimize the… Well I don’t even know what I thought I was saving with small pieces, perhaps I put it in the bin of lack of experience about rust working… Anyway, I also did get a JAZ safety fuel tank to test fit to the trunk, although the supports for it are not yet done…

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In the background of the project I have been planning the whole electric system from the scratch to minimize the non-necessary wiring and make the electric system more simplified. And yes, I think the “trying to minimize” actually works here better than it did with the rust repairs. Along with the wiring and the relays needed for the engine and the lights, signals, etc. I decided I would try to make the whole instrument panel as well. The design would follow the one that is found on the 205 T16 civil version. The schematics and circuit board design have also taken a lot of hours since I’m not that familiar with electronics, but I am very happy that nowadays you really can find anything on the Internet and learn anything for free if you really want to. Below is a picture of the possible layout of the gauges in the instrument panel and few pictures of the prototypes that I have made so far regarding to the panel.

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I had a vacation trip to London in May 2018 and I thought I would combine the visit with the store I have bought majority of the engine parts from, the Spoox Motorsport that is located in Leicester, a 105-mile drive from the London. It was nice to try to drive in the opposite direction that I have used to, especially starting from the busy central London. Anyway, I drove about 300 miles in the UK at its not that difficult once you get used to it. I didn’t leave the Spoox empty-handed thought, as I did pick up a Turbosmart Hypergate 45 -Wastegate that I had ordered upfront. Plus, I did see their time-attack 205 live up-close, which itself was a sight worth the visit.

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Summer went without any major progress to the project except for the electronics schematic and circuit board design. Summertime dents to go along with other hobbies as I try to be as small burden as I possibly can to my friend’s and keep the machine hall empty during the summertime when they need it the most.

I got back to the actual progression in the November 2018. I started of making a mold of the hood for the upcoming carbon fiber version of it. Oh yea, I did also get about 25 m2 (269 sq. feet if I did the conversion right) of that stuff in the late 2017. The mold took the rest of the available hobby hours in the 2018. The stripes that are visible in the mold are traces of the old paint that was attached to the resin gelcoat, but they are easily removed since I need to polish the mold before using it as well as wax it anyway.

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From the 2017 Black Friday I did invest myself two Bosch “044” fuel pumps along with Bosch EV14 1300cc injectors. And, like it would surprise anyone at this point, I don’t have picture of these YET… But on 2018 Black Friday I was able to get fuel lines with a discount. The fuel lines are going to be AN-8 stainless steel hard pipe and AN-8 Teflon stainless steel braided hose with Aeroflow full flow fittings.

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I think I’ll save the 2019 catch up for yet another post, since it will include much visible and actual progress, and the best part, PHOTOS! Yes, I did learn from my mistakes from the 2018 and I have been taking MUCH more photos in 2019.

I will make a recap of all the parts I have acquired and the things I have done and also the things I have been planning to do with the project. I’ll add the recap when the story catches up the present time, which is after the next big post. I think my current problem with the project is that I have way too many parts waiting ready. In other words, this project’s work planning sucks, and we all know who to blame about that :)

-WalesRR

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11 hours ago, Wales said:

I’ll have the compression ratio raised using longer rods and lowering the pistons

Try to use a forged DW10 crank:  +47cc and +1mm at TDC

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Serious power goals!  Now I have to wonder what the plan is for gearbox and differential upgrades to handle that kind of power!

Thanks for the clear pic of the bracket!   My only suggestion would be to consider gussets to strenthen the joints with the highest load paths. 

Absolutely LOVE the carbon hood idea!  I cheated and was just going to do a carbon insert into the middle of the existing hood to make it simpler - you went all out!  Well done.

Rabin

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11 hours ago, SRDT said:

Try to use a forged DW10 crank:  +47cc and +1mm at TDC

I will keep that in mind, thanks!

3 hours ago, Bean said:

Serious power goals!  Now I have to wonder what the plan is for gearbox and differential upgrades to handle that kind of power!

Thanks for the clear pic of the bracket!   My only suggestion would be to consider gussets to strenthen the joints with the highest load paths. 

Absolutely LOVE the carbon hood idea!  I cheated and was just going to do a carbon insert into the middle of the existing hood to make it simpler - you went all out!  Well done.

Rabin

I have been wondering the gearbox and differential upgrades ever since I started this project. I would really like to keep the original type of the drivetrain, which is rigid, light and makes independent rear suspension possible. I guess it is possible to modify some other gearbox and differential to utilize housed propeller shaft. Initially, I was going to use the stock differential with an Quaife LSD, but since I don't have any idea how much torque the stock gearbox and differential could possibly withstand, I think it could be waste of money at this point. So I decided I would keep on building the engine and have it benched first, then I'll find out the limits of the stock drivetrain by trial and error. By the way, the clutch disc is actually meant for Bmw, but I did modify (Jan 2019) it a bit to fit on the BA10 clutch axle, so I think this car could see some gearbox from the bmw in the future..

The gussets should be enough for the strengthening. About the carbon hood, I think it is not well done until the part itself is finished, since the molding was the easy part. I have some experience working with composites, but for the hood I think I'll have to utilize vacuum, and that is something that I am not yet familiar with. But yeah, the mold itself turned out to be pretty good and it is transparent so it would be easier to see trapped air bubbles in the actual part.

 

-Wales

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For the instrument panel the big boost gauge should be white with a blue needle, just like the one on allmost any french turbo race car from the 80':

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205 Turbo 16, 405 Turbo 16, 505 Superproduction, 309 Turbo Cup, Citroen AX Superproduction, R5 Turbo, R21 Superproduction, R11 Turbo Gr.A...

 

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Here's a link to a possible option for the differential:  http://www.overveldtrading.nl/peugeot-parts.html

Bas Overveld contacted me back in 2012, and makes them for these very cool racing buggies in the Netherlands.  The LSD he developed used BMW guts so that would go well with some of the other parts you're using.  BA10/5 is tougher - I've read the issue it has is the case isn't strong enough and it flexes enough to loose gear tooth engagement which causes the gears to shear teeth.  There may be a way to strengthen the case, but again it's not something that's been done too much.  They did run them in Superproduction 505 race cars, but the most I heard those cars making was 500HP.

Another option would be to use Toyota Supra transmission and rear differential - but parts might be harder to find and expensive.  LOTS of gearing options however as the Supra diff shares the internals with the truck differentials.

SRDT:  I'd never known that about the boost gauge and now I must replicate this in my cars too!  I've got an AEM Tru-Boost set up and I think I should be able to get the optional white face for it.  :)

Rabin

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On 4/11/2019 at 10:26 PM, SRDT said:

For the instrument panel the big boost gauge should be white with a blue needle, just like the one on allmost any french turbo race car from the 80':

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205 Turbo 16, 405 Turbo 16, 505 Superproduction, 309 Turbo Cup, Citroen AX Superproduction, R5 Turbo, R21 Superproduction, R11 Turbo Gr.A...

 

The color theme of the instumnt panel is by no means decided yet so it would be really neat to use the style and colors from the golden turbo era :)

39 minutes ago, Bean said:

Here's a link to a possible option for the differential:  http://www.overveldtrading.nl/peugeot-parts.html

Bas Overveld contacted me back in 2012, and makes them for these very cool racing buggies in the Netherlands.  The LSD he developed used BMW guts so that would go well with some of the other parts you're using.  BA10/5 is tougher - I've read the issue it has is the case isn't strong enough and it flexes enough to loose gear tooth engagement which causes the gears to shear teeth.  There may be a way to strengthen the case, but again it's not something that's been done too much.  They did run them in Superproduction 505 race cars, but the most I heard those cars making was 500HP.

Another option would be to use Toyota Supra transmission and rear differential - but parts might be harder to find and expensive.  LOTS of gearing options however as the Supra diff shares the internals with the truck differentials.

SRDT:  I'd never known that about the boost gauge and now I must replicate this in my cars too!  I've got an AEM Tru-Boost set up and I think I should be able to get the optional white face for it.  :)

Rabin

Oh okay, I thought the gearbox would be the weakest link since the jeep guys seems to dislike it over anything else, but if it was really used on the 505 super production it cant be that bad. I wouldn't want to use the supra powertrain, althought it would be superior, but also lot heavier than the stock one. But I can't reject the supra one totally since if I dont get something lighter to stay in one piece, well then I will just need it or similar.

 

Last big update in a moment, I'll add the pictures and its ready.

 

-Wales

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January 2019 – April 2019

The TTV Racing clutch disc I have is meant for BMW, and it fits 10-spline 29 mm clutch axle. It was really close to actually fit straight to the BA10 clutch axle, however the spline shape is a bit different. BMW ones are straight, where Peugeot’s are a bit conical. The modification was quite easy with a help from my friend who has a lathe. He grinded the hard metal tool to fit the BMW spline.  I just machined the inner diameter little bit bigger, and then we “sliced” about 0.2 mm at the time from the one tooth of the disc, repeating at every tooth as many times that the disc fitted to the Peugeot clutch axle. In the pictures you can see the disc before and after the operation. The stock TI disc is in the top and below is the new disc with the BMW hub.

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After the clutch disc was modified, next on the schedule was one the biggest milestones of the project: Test fitting the engine to the car itself. The engine had never been in the engine bay before, so I was excited to see that it actually does fit there.

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During the initial test fit I measured everything I saw necessary, because the next steps would be combining the BA10 with the XU10J4RS and making the engine supports. I had already made a cad drawing from the clutch bellhousing engine side flange back in 2017 December and I had it water cut in November 2018. I test fitted the bellhousing flange and flywheel with clutch cover along with the starter. Since I don't know would turning the engine straight cause issues with oil and/or water circulation,  I'm aiming for 15 degree engine tilt, so it would be half of the original, but still more than 0.

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Following the initial test fit of the engine to the car and the clutch bellhousing flange, I made engine support prototypes, so it would be easier to manufacture the actual parts.

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With the flange cut ready, it was much easier to measure and perform the necessary modifications to the existing BA10 clutch cover. I tried welding aluminum with an MIG welder for the first time during this process and I have to say, I was positively surprised how easy it was and how good the result turned out to be. 

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I transferred the crankshaft position sensor location from the original XU10J4RS gearbox by using a jig that I welded to ensure right positioning. After welding the crankshaft position sensors insert, I finished the whole bellhousing by making the inserts for the hex hole bolts that secure the bellhousing to the engine. I also filleted the welding beads. I left the starter motor’s securing position un-finished for now, since I want to test that the starter does hit the tooth ring before locking the starters position permanently.

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For the “ever growing pile of parts that are invested way too early”, I added the roll cage tubing, 3” stainless steel pipe for exhaust pipe, 42.4 mm stainless steel pipe for the exhaust manifold and aluminum 50 mm OD pipe for the intake manifold, plus a collection of stainless bends that are needed in the whole exhaust system. Furthermore, I raised the pile with 3.5” stainless pipe for the downpipe and 48.3 mm stainless pipe for the wastegate routing that are not in the pictures yet. The roll cage tubings are the ones with blue caps.

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After test fitting the engine again with the engine support prototypes, I began to manufacture the actual upper halves of the engine supports. I made only the upper ones at this point since I want to test fit the engine one more time when oil sump is ready and oil pump is fitted.

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Speaking of oil pump, I ended up buying a Pace dry sump oil pump. The engine conversion could be doable with the XU10J4RS stock pump, but it would need custom back plate for the oil pump (Which I actually did back in 2018 winter), because the suction point needs to be modified. The oil sump would need to be really wide and utilize trap door to have a decent capacity for oil, those are the main reason for me to choose the dry sump option. I already started manufacturing the oil sump, but I’m not yet sure will I proceed with the current design.

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Last thing that I have done to this project is the oil filter blanking flange, it is pretty basic design with 2 O-ring seals and it is cnc machined from aluminum. It is attached to the block with the M20x1,5 thread and in the other end is AN-10 for the line that is coming from the oil filter or the oil cooler. A picture of this will be added later.

So yea, I guess that concludes the current situation of the project. The next steps are the continuing the oil sump, and after that making the lower halves of the engine mounts and trying to keep on taking enough pictures.

I’ll add the summary of the things that I have done so far and the parts I have used and also the planned things later this weekend.

 

-Wales

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2 hours ago, Bean said:

I'd never known that about the boost gauge and now I must replicate this in my cars too!

The real gauge is a custom aircraft instrument, the only one wit the correct range that I ever saw on sale was from a WW2 airplane and so had radium paint inside...

You can also buy a replica for quite a bit of money.

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Wow, I'm excited to see more! The best 505 that never was...

Did you experience any issues changing the engine from transverse to longitudinal?

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It was done more than once for the XUD, even with a BA/7 gearbox.

For the engine tilt 18,5° was possible with DW10 oil pump and sump, there is also the Peugeot J5 / Citroën C25 with a XUD9A engine that was at best straight if not slightly leaning forward.

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Questions:  How did you align the transmission input shaft with the crankshaft in order to weld the new flange onto the belhousing?  

And are you using a spool gun to weld the aluminum?   It looks amazing and I'm shocked at how well the mig is welding it!  I wanted to weld up changes to the N9TE intake manifold and your set up would be ideal for that as well.

Lastly - what is your tool of choice for cutting and shaping the aluminum?   I tried a reciprocating saw for cast alloy intake but it was very slow going.

Rabin

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I'm late as usual to say, a very interesting project, have you considered using a Opel Omega 2,5td gearbox, like i did. What turbocharger are you planning to use.

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On 4/13/2019 at 2:00 AM, ofArc said:

Wow, I'm excited to see more! The best 505 that never was...

Did you experience any issues changing the engine from transverse to longitudinal?

Hi,

There are not really issues with the changing engine direction, although the oil pan design is a bit tricky since there is not much room between the engine and the subframe. Also, you can't raise the engine in the engine bay since there is not much room between the engine and the hood either.

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18 hours ago, Bean said:

Questions:  How did you align the transmission input shaft with the crankshaft in order to weld the new flange onto the belhousing?  

And are you using a spool gun to weld the aluminum?   It looks amazing and I'm shocked at how well the mig is welding it!  I wanted to weld up changes to the N9TE intake manifold and your set up would be ideal for that as well.

Lastly - what is your tool of choice for cutting and shaping the aluminum?   I tried a reciprocating saw for cast alloy intake but it was very slow going.

Rabin

I used this bracket to align the input shaft to the engine:

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The input shaft was supported by the crankshaft's bearing and I also lightened the weight of the gearbox with a cargo strap hooked from the engine crane. Then I welded the flange to bellhousing wherever they matched each other close enough, after this, I removed the gearbox from the bracket to be modified where needed. I hope that I managed to write this process in a way that it does explain it.

About the welding, yes, I have heard, mainly from older people, that you can't weld aluminum without a spool gun. That was the main reason why I was so surprised that I didn't have any problems using the spoolless gun. The welding machine I am using is Kemppi MinarcMig EVO 200, and it has ready programs for mild, stainless, aluminum and CuSi brazing. I only changed the inner welding wire tubing from the default metal spiral to a Teflon one. The welding wire didn’t get stuck at all. As for protective gas I had to use Argon.

I found out that the basic metal saw, a cordless hack saw and the angle grinder with a 1 mm cutting disc works out nicely for cutting. I also used the 2 mm cutting discs meant for aluminum, but I found out that they work out nicely on the cast aluminum. With a new aluminum sheet, the aluminum cutting disc is slow and it heats the sheet a lot. As for shaping the aluminum, my choice is this kind of tool for pneumatic straight grinder, since it is really fast, and it doesn’t get clogged:

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Its the same they use on milling machines.

 

7 minutes ago, Goce said:

I'm late as usual to say, a very interesting project, have you considered using a Opel Omega 2,5td gearbox, like i did. What turbocharger are you planning to use.

Hi,

I have read your topic, really cool build indeed! I think the using the same gearbox as you did, is one suitable option.

For the turbocharger, I have got my eyes on Garrett GTX3076R Gen2… Expensive, but it would be the frosting on the cake…

-Wales

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Nice choose, on the turbocharger, those Gen2 are amazing, the response and the spool up times are so quick, on a good tune feels like a v8 no turbo lag at all. Keep up the good work.

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